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PMI's Knowledge & Wisdom Center.

@DmPlus 18/09/2009 0

Siga o Rio de Janeiro no Instagram: :)
Em minhas andanças internas do site do PMI descobri o PMI’s Knowledge & Wisdom Center. É um serviço para os membros que disponibiliza uma bibliotecária para efetuar pesquisas para você!

Muito util para quem esta buscando alguma referencia bibliografica, livro, revista etc e, se quer publicar algo.

Mais uma vantagem que muitos não sabem de ser associado ao PMI

Abaixo segue a solicitação que fiz e, o encaminhamento da resposta.

Solicitação :


—–Original Message—–
From: Do not Reply [
mailto:donotreply@pmi.org]
Sent: Thu 9/10/2009 3:18 PM
To: Marian Quinn
Subject: Search Assistance Request

Search Assistance Request

Requestor Name: Helio A. Ferenhof, MBA, PMP
Request Date: 9/10/2009
PMI Membership Number: xxx
PMI R.E.P. Number:
Are You a Student? Yes
Company/Organization: GotRoot
Title: Mr.
Phone Number: +55-48-xxx
E-mail Address: xxx@xxx.com.br
Country: Brazil
How did you hear about K&WC? PMI Website
Statement Of Question: What defines success and failure of projects?
Purpose Of Information: Writing scientific article.
Notes, Comments, Keywords: More updated as possible references. (scientific articles, dissertations and thesis).
Schemas, tables, and graphics that explains success and failure are welcome

REsposta:

Lisa Panzer <xxx@pmi.org> Tue, Sep 15, 2009 at 11:58 AM

To: xxx@xxx.com.br

Dear Helio A. Ferenhof,

Thank you for contacting PMI’s Knowledge & Wisdom Center.  Listed below the signature line are citations and abstracts to PMI literature  related to your topic, as well as Web site links to other resources.  Should you wish to purchase items in the PMI Marketplace (such as books or full text articles), you may do so by clicking the link below each item in the list below.  This link will take you to the item description in the Marketplace.  Once you have viewed the description you can click the link “Add to cart” to purchase the item.  For members, articles from PM Network® and Project Management Journal® from the past 5 years to the present can be added to your cart at no charge.  All other articles and papers are US$10.00 for members.  Once you have completed your purchase, most articles and papers will be available for download from your Digital Lockbox.  Please note that some older articles are available for print delivery only.
Also included below are references to book titles in eReads & Reference, a 24×7 service providing members access to full text e-Books at no additional charge. To access eReads & Reference, visit https://www.pmi.org/Resources/Pages/Members/eReads-and-Reference.aspx.  You will need to be logged in to PMI.org using your PMI.org username and password to access the eReads & Reference service.
I hope this information is helpful to you.  Please let me know if I may be of further assistance.
Sincerely,

Lisa Panzer, MLS
Reference Librarian, PMI Knowledge & Wisdom Center
Project Management Institute
14 Campus Boulevard
Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA
Phone: +1-610-356-4600, ext. 7024
E-mail:
Lisa.Panzer@pmi.org
*Disclaimer: The material supplied by the Knowledge & Wisdom Center is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as advice or instruction. PMI does not endorse, recommend or warrant the accuracy of the information provided. The recipient uses the information at his/her own risk and responsibility.

Submit a paper, poster or symposium proposal for presentation at the 2010 PMI Research and Education Conference. The conference will take place in Washington, DC, USA, on 11-14 July 2010. Proposals may be submitted until 1 December 2009.

PMI Marketplace

Title: My Life is Failure
Author: Jim Johnson
Pages: 200
Format: Paperback
Category: Information Technology
Stock: In Stock
Price: $79.20
Member Price: $63.35
You Save $15.85 by being a PMI member
Student Member Price: $63.35
Detailed Description: 100 Things You Should Know to be a Better Project Leader. My Life is Failure is a summation of over a decade of work on project failure. The Standish Group has been collecting case information on real-life IT environments and software development projects since 1985. Standish’s cumulative research encompasses 12 years of data on why projects succeed or fail, representing more than 50,000 completed IT projects.
Publisher: The Standish Group International, Inc
Date Published: July 2006
Subjects: Leadership.|Project Management (PM)|Project Success.
ISBN10: 1424308410
ISBN13: 9781424308415
PMI Product ID: 00100082601
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100082601
Literature on Project Management Success Factors

PMI literature
Title Statement: A brand new day / by Gary R. Heerkens.
Main Author – Personal: Heerkens, Gary.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 23, no. 3 (Mar. 2009).
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: c2009
Series: Viewpoints. The business of projects
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: The world of business is a world dependent on trade. And driving this dynamic are the projects that enable businesses to perform better by delivering the goods and services that clients need and customers want. This article overviews the business side of project management. In doing so, it lists three financial implications of investing in projects. It also describes how project managers can increase their organizational worth by understanding the purpose a project plays in helping a company compete.
Subjects: Project Success.|Business Case.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] p. : col. ill., port. ; 28 cm.
CID: 9769
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101161500&iss=1

Title Statement: All ears / by Elisa Ludwig ; photo by Debbie Zimelman.
Main Author – Personal: Ludwig, Elisa.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 23, no. 3 (Mar. 2009), p. []-62.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: c2009
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Although project managers lead project teams in reaching successful outcomes, it is the project teams that performs the work that required to realize the project. Because of this, experienced project managers understand the significance of enabling project team members. This article discusses how project managers can optimize their listening skills so as to gain the commitment of project team members, a technique which helps motivate performance and build a collaborative project team atmosphere. In doing so, it explains why listening skills are important to develop and how these skills help project managers perform better. It explains techniques that project managers can use to encourage more thoughtful project team discussions and create opportunities for generating creative conflicts. It then overviews how project managers can maintain discussions that focus on helping–and not hindering–the project’s outcome. Accompanying this article is a sidebar suggesting how project managers can engage less-talkative project team members.
Subjects: Teams in the workplace–Management.|Leadership.|Project Team–Management.|Project Manager (PM)–Attitudes.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] p. : col. ports. ; 28 cm.
CID: 9774
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101162000&iss=1


Title Statement: Nothing personal / by Neal Whitten.
Main Author – Personal: Whitten, Neal.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 23, no. 1 (Jan. 2009), p. 28-[].
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: c2009
Series: Viewpoints. Leadership
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Success is often the result of right attitude. This article discusses the problems that ensue when project managers allow their performance to become personal. In doing so, it explains six situations that deeply affected the performance of a project manager that the author had previously mentored. It looks at why project managers must stay focused on serving their teams, projects, and business–and not on their own passion, egos, and desires.
Subjects: Leadership–Attitudes.|Project Manager (PM)–Attitudes.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] p. : col. ill., port. ; 28 cm.
CID: 9747
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101159400&iss=1

Title Statement: Defining project success [electronic resource] : a multilevel framework / Paul L. Bannerman.
Main Author – Personal: Bannerman, Paul L.
Journal Citation: PMI Research Conference 2008. Proceedings, MP11-Paul Bannerman_final_050708.pdf.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Researchers, project professionals, and executives have long been attempting to define project success. But despite the numerous discussions, surveys, and recommendations, none have developed a comprehensive definition. This paper examines a five-level framework for gauging project success–in relation to information systems (IS) development projects–that the author developed from the seminal literature on project success. In doing so, it describes the nature of projects and the challenges involved in achieving successful outcomes; it overviews the literature on project success so as to define the problems associated with achieving project success, identifying success criteria and contingency variables, and recognizing gaps between the research and practice dimensions. It looks at project success in relation to realizing project parameters–schedule, budget, scope, and quality–and in relation to achieving business, strategic, and process success through projects. It then outlines the five-level framework, detailing each level’s purpose, process, criteria, and rules for identifying a project’s performance. It applies the model to six actual IS projects, analyzing how project managers can use this framework to overcome the problems involved in successfully realizing IS outcomes.
Subjects: Project Success–Evaluation–Methodology.
Conference Names: PMI Research Conference (2008 : Warsaw, Poland)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9349
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101084900&iss=1

Title Statement: Five key elements to process improvement project success [electronic resource] / Harry Rever.
Main Author – Personal: Rever, Harry.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–North America. Proceedings, ADV30NA08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: To improve performance, organizations will frequently launch process improvement projects. But all too often, these projects fail to deliver the results expected. This paper examines five actions that can help organizations develop and implement the process-oriented projects which will help them improve their business performance. In doing so, it describes the dynamics and the challenges involved in performing and managing each action. It then explains how project managers can successfully accomplish each action’s goals, noting the skills they must develop and the tools and techniques they can adopt and adapt.
Subjects: Process control.|Project Success.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2008 : Denver, Colo.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : col. ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9548
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101121700&iss=1

Title Statement: How to find WOW! projects [electronic resource] / John Dohm.
Main Author – Personal: Dohm, John.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–North America. Proceedings, ADV24NA08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: The projects which fail to meet expectations are often the projects that were not properly planned and linked to benefits. This paper examines a process that can help project managers recognize the projects with the capacity to deliver expected benefits, projects that the author terms WOW! projects. In doing so, it overviews the types of work that organizations generally perform–work to realize benefits and work to reduce costs and errors; it defines the concept of WOW! projects and describes four categories of WOW! projects. It then discusses how project managers can help their organizations pursue WOW! projects. It also identifies what project managers can do to plan and implement WOW! projects; it lists six guidelines for managing WOW! projects.
Subjects: Project Success–Methodology.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2008 : Denver, Colo.)
Physical Description: [] printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9542
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101121100&iss=1

Title Statement: Reality project management–troubled projects [electronic resource] : 9 additional examples of troubled projects and recommended solutions / Joan Knutson.
Main Author – Personal: Knutson, Joan.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–North America. Proceedings, ADV32NA08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Troubled projects often share common problems. This paper defines nine problems common to troubled projects. In doing so, it explains how each problem affects project teams and their ability to implement the project. It also details several solutions–for each problem–that can help project managers prevent these problems from occurring.
Subjects: Project Success.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2008 : Denver, Colo.)
Physical Description: [] printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9550
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101121900&iss=1

Title Statement: Critical chain buffer sizing [electronic resource] : a comparative study / Alexandra B. Tenera.
Main Author – Personal: Tenera, Alexandra B.
Journal Citation: PMI Research Conference 2008. Proceedings, MP10-Alexandra Tenera_Final_051308.pdf.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Successfully implementing a project plan hinges on the project manager’s ability to develop a schedule that accommodates both the project’s activities and its setbacks. This paper examines how project management can apply critical chain project management (CCPM) to plan uncertain project activities. In doing so, it describes–mostly in relation to the Theory of Constraints–CCPM’s six principles; it identifies the main challenges involved in using CCPM. It then outlines several equations that can help project managers calculate the underlying variability which could affect a project schedule’s critical chain activities; it explains the SMC method for developing estimated project schedule buffers, noting the logic that informs this approach and the process of using Monte Carlo Simulation for gauging project buffer sizing. It recommends an experimental design approach for assessing the impact of sizing methods; it lists the three methods which the author considered for sizing the study’s buffers. It also discusses the impact of using buffers to identify the duration of scheduled project activities; it compares the performance of different buffers and discusses this study’s findings.
Subjects: Critical Chain Method [Technique]|Theory of constraints (Management)|Project Schedule [Output/Input]–Management.|Uncertainty.
Conference Names: PMI Research Conference (2008 : Warsaw, Poland)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9348
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101084800&iss=1

Title Statement: Success criteria and factors for international development projects : a life-cycle-based framework / Do Ba Khang, Tun Lin Mae.
Main Author – Personal: Khang, Do Ba.
Journal Citation: Project management journal. Vol. 39, no. 1 (Mar. 2008), p. 72-84.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: As previous researchers have shown, each phase in the project life cycle has its own factors for success. This article examines a conceptual life-cycle model that identifies–for each phase in the life cycle–the different sets of project success factors for not-for-profit international development projects. In doing so, it reviews the literature on defining the criteria to measure project success, explaining the three dimensions of project success, the two concepts of success (project management success and project success), and the project management competencies and concerns involved in managing development projects within developing nations. It describes the characteristics, issues, and stakeholders common to implementing international development projects; it overviews the problems that may emerge when stakeholders fail to effectively collaborate. It then outlines the proposed life-cycle-based model–developed in relation to the logical framework approach (LFA)–and lists each life-cycle phase’s key activities, players, and products. It discusses the findings of a study to validate this model, a study that surveyed the stakeholders involved in both Official Development Assistance (ODA) projects and international non-governmental organizations (INGO) operating in Vietnam and Myanmar. It identifies stakeholder views on success criteria and critical success factors for each phase in an international development project’s life cycle.
Subjects: Project Success.|International development.|Project Life Cycle.
Additional Names: Mae, Tun Lin.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 9167
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101058100&iss=1

Title Statement: Break the cycle / by Susan Ladika.
Main Author – Personal: Ladika, Susan.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 22, no. 2 (Feb. 2008), p. 74-77.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Series: Best of congress papers
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: All too frequently, organizations that fail to successfully implement a strategic project decide to reduce or discontinue their future investments in project management initiatives. Because of this, and the belief that project management is a wasteful use of resources, senior managers often distrust project proposals and resent project management. But as experienced project managers know, failures can generate future success when organizations learn–and then apply–the lessons which failure grants. This article discusses the significance of integrating a lessons learned process into a project management practice. Based on the white paper “Lessons Learned: Taking it to the Next level” that Sandra F. Rowe presented at the PMI Global Congress 2007–EMEA (Budapest, Hungary), it discusses the purpose of embracing a lessons-learned approach and defines the five steps involved in a formal process for capturing lessons learned. It lists four questions which can help project team members identify both the problems that cause a project to fail and the attributes that enable a team to succeed. It also explains how an organization can capture, evaluate, and distribute a project team’s lessons learned, noting the significance in disseminating this information through an organization and to other project teams.
Subjects: Lessons Learned [Output/Input]|Project Success.
Additional Names: Rowe, Sandra F. Lessons learned [electronic resource] : taking it to the next level. PMI Global Congress 2007–EMEA. Proceedings, PMT02EMEA07.PDF.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–EMEA (2007 : Budapest, Hungary)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Notes: “This article is based on material in the white paper ‘Lessons Learned: Taking it to the Next Level’ presented by Sandra F. Rowe, PMP, at the PMI Global Congress 2007–EMEA in Budapest, Hungary.”–P. 77.
CID: 9101
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101060100&iss=1

Title Statement: The intersection of project success and project leadership [electronic resource] / William T. Craddock.
Main Author – Personal: Craddock, William T.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–Asia Pacific. Proceedings, GBS02AP08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Project success and project leadership share one key similarity: Project professionals debate and assert a variety of definitions for each. This paper examines the basic attributes of project success and project leadership so as to identify the point where these two concepts intersect. In doing so, it discusses the literature on the concept of change as it relates to the nature of managing projects. It describes paradigms and the impact of paradigm shifts; it defines both project successes and project leadership, identifying each concept’s major issues. It also looks at the project leader’s role in creating a project vision and the way vision influences a project team’s accomplishments. It then outlines the points at which project success and project leadership intersect. It overviews the factors which can affect the nature of this intersection.
Subjects: Project Success.|Leadership.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–Asia Pacific (2008 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Physical Description: [] printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9128
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101078900&iss=1

Title Statement: On becoming a C-level executive and developing breakthrough strategies [electronic resource] / Steve Garfein.
Main Author – Personal: Garfein, Stephen J.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–Asia Pacific. Proceedings, PDS01AP08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Successfully managing a portfolio of projects demands both tactical and strategic skills. This paper–the author’s sixth PMI Global Congress paper on project portfolio management (PPM)–examines how project managers can develop a strategic model for practicing PPM and a framework for developing breakthrough strategies. In doing so, it describes the differences between tactical and strategic initiatives and outlines a strategic model for practicing PPM, explaining the key issues and objectives involved in using this model as well as showing the relationship between PPM and executive management and PPM and project and program management. It then details the framework for developing breakthrough strategies, identifying the characteristics of a strong-operating enterprise and discussing the three steps involved in creating breakthrough strategies. It looks at three companies (Boeing, Apple, Apache Helicopters) that implemented breakthrough strategies successfully and one company (Enron) that did not. It also defines the responsibilities for two new PPM-related executive positions and lists the nine differences between a portfolio manager and a strategic portfolio manager.
Subjects: Portfolio Management [Technique]|Strategic planning–Methodology.|Executives–Training of.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–Asia Pacific (2008 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. (some col.).
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9142
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101080300&iss=1

Title Statement: Aligning strategy, leadership, and culture for project success [electronic resource] / Lawrence V. Suda.
Main Author – Personal: Suda, Lawrence V.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–EMEA. Proceedings, ADV07.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Before making plans to improve organizational performance and develop new operational strategies, executives must first understand the culture defining their enterprise. This paper examines how project managers can most effectively align organizational strategy and culture so as to help project teams successfully implement projects. In doing so, it defines the concept of organizational culture and discusses some of the core concerns involved in understanding organizational culture. It lists four advantages to understanding organizational culture; it overviews the literature looking at how organizational culture affects business success and personal behavior. It also identifies a four-stage process for creating a unified culture that supports efforts to achieve business goals. It then discusses four archetypes–or epistemologies–of social cultures (control, collaboration, competence, and cultivation) and details the characteristics distinguishing these archetypes.
Subjects: Corporate culture.|Strategic planning.|Project Success.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–EMEA (2008 : San Giljan, Malta)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9222
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101076500&iss=1

Title Statement: The Hunting Territory®, optimizing project outcomes and enabling project-based organizations [electronic resource] / Istvan Gorgenyi, Rod Gozzard.
Main Author – Personal: Gorgenyi, Istvan.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–Asia Pacific. Proceedings, TMG02AP08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Organizations are increasingly realizing that market success is significantly determined by project team performance, by how well project team members cooperate, collaborate, and contribute. This paper examines an approach–known as the Hunting Territory model–that organizations can use to help their project teams perform effectively and efficiently, an approach that can help organizational leaders resolve the issues that often significantly–and usually, unnecessarily–impede a project team’s performance. In doing so, it overviews the nature of conflict within a project team and defines the concepts of cooperation and collaboration. It then outlines the Hunting Territory model, listing its three aspects as well as the three components–life cycle, structure, communication–composing the model’s System of Team Life. It details each of these components, explaining the nature of each component’s dynamics and discussing the way in which each affects a project team’s performance. It also describes the leadership actions and the project management tools that project managers can use to implement the Hunting Territory model.
Subjects: Project Management (PM)–Methodology.|Project Team–Management.|Projectized Organization.
Additional Names: Gozzard, Rod.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–Asia Pacific (2008 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Physical Description: [] printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9150
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101081100&iss=1


Title Statement: Global projects [electronic resource] : how to manage them successfully? / Vittal Anantatmula, Michael Thomas.
Main Author – Personal: Anantatmula, Vittal S., 1955-
Journal Citation: PMI Research Conference 2008. Proceedings, V02-Vittal Anantatmula.pdf.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: As more organizations expand the operations to compete in the global marketplace, more project managers are routinely managing global projects, and with this, navigating their way through the myriad of issues, influences, and challenges involved in managing culturally diverse and globally located project teams. This paper examines the inter-relation of the enablers and barriers involved in implementing global projects. In doing so, it defines the concept of a global project, listing its three dimensions; it overviews the field’s literature on the enablers and barriers of global projects, identifying twelve key factors which project managers and project teams working on global projects most commonly encounter and must frequently leverage or resolve, factors that can significantly affect a global project’s outcome. It describes the authors’ two research methodologies–including interpretive structural modeling (ISM)–to explore the dependency relations which affect (positively and negatively) the outcomes of global projects. It also reports the authors’ survey findings and outlines their comprehensive global projects success model, noting the five factors which can impact a project’s outcome. It then analyzes the critical roles and responsibilities of project managers and project teams working on global projects, discussing these–and the enablers and barriers–in relation to a logical flow of causal influences.
Subjects: Globalization.|Virtual Team–Computer networks.|Project Success.
Additional Names: Thomas, Michael.
Conference Names: PMI Research Conference (2008 : Warsaw, Poland)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. (some col.).
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9373
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101087300&iss=1

Title Statement: Project management in a flat world [electronic resource] / Scott Matta.
Main Author – Personal: Matta, B. Scott.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2008–North America. Proceedings, ADV14NA08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2008
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Managing a global project successfully involves mitigating and resolving a myriad of unfamiliar conditions and unforeseeable events. This paper examines the lesser-known challenges involved in practicing project management globally. In doing so, it defines five types of projects and discusses approaches to obtaining executive commitments and local support–and for maintaining these commitments and support once these are obtained; it explains four challenges that the author experienced as forces which can interfere with a global project’s progress. It describes methods that project managers can use to prevent these challenges, looking also at the challenges in–and possible solutions for–defining stakeholder expectations, communicating project messages, and establishing ownership and building commitment. It then identifies potential problems that could impair a global project team’s performance and suggests solutions for preventing these performance issues.
Subjects: Project Team–Management.|Multinational work teams.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2008 : Denver, Colo.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. (some col.).
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 9532
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101120100&iss=1

Title Statement: Success of projects in different organizational conditions / Irja Hyväri.
Main Author – Personal: Hyväri, Irja.
Journal Citation: Project management journal. Vol. 37, no. 4 (Sept. 2006), p. 31-41.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2006
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: As more companies implement projects to achieve their objectives, many of these companies are also using project management to best accomplish their goals. Despite this development, the literature lacks a clear view on what enables projects to succeed and what causes projects to fail. This article examines a survey on the factors critical to project success and failure, factors relating to different organizational conditions and project phases. In doing so, it reviews the literature on project success and discusses the field’s gap in research on project success within organizational contexts and its lack of knowledge about different success factors for different project phases. It explains a study on the factors of project success and project failure, one that involved a 54-question survey administered in 2002 to 25 Finnish project managers, one that explored how organizations practice project management. It then describes the survey results, classifying into one of nine categories the projects that the participants implemented during the 12 months prior to this study; it lists each surveyed project’s critical success/failure factors, analyzing the relationships between the top three success factors for five different categories. It describes the author’s use of a project implementation profile (PIP) to minimize bias when comparing these relationships against the results of previously published studies. It explains the significance of these findings.
Subjects: Project Success.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., port. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 8066
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100956600&iss=1

Title: The definition of success
Author(s): Thiry, Michel.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 20, no. 12 (Dec. 2006), p. 21-22.
Contained in: PM network. Vol. 20, no. 12 (Dec. 2006)
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2006
Series: Viewpoints. Executive speak
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Although every organization defines project success in its own way, the general

concept of project success is defined by several common factors. This article identifies the
common denominator that most organizations use to define project success. In doing so, it
overviews several projects that the author has managed, identifying each client’s parameters
for project success. It then defines five common factors that most companies, regardless of
industry or culture, use to measure the outcome of their projects, factors that include
responding to stakeholder needs, maintaining current capabilities, evaluating opportunities
and risks, measuring a project’s operational value, and selecting projects that organizations
possess the capacity to realize.
Subjects: Project Success.
Corp. Author: Project Management Institute.
Phys. Description: [] p. : col. ill., port. ; 28 cm.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 8407
Title: Getting executives to act for project success
Author(s): O’Brochta, Michael.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2006–Asia Pacific. Proceedings, MPM02.PDF.
Contained in: PMI Global Congress 2006–Asia Pacific. Proceedings.
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2006
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Without the active participation and support of executives, even the best planned project will most likely fail. To counter a lack of executive involvement, project managers must use many sources of power to influence an executive’s contribution and commitment. This paper looks at how project managers can obtain an executive’s support. In doing so, it examines why the evolving and expanding definition of project success creates project environments that make project managers more dependent on executive participation. Informed by the author’s experience leading a program to mature project management within a large organization as well as to train more than 1,000 project managers a year, it defines the project role that executives play, identifies the evolving definition of project success, and details the impact of both in relation to project managers and their work. It then lists ten actions that executives can implement to help their project managers successfully realize projects. It also lists eight questions that executives should ask of their project managers and outlines eight actions that project managers can use to spur executives into action.
Subjects: Project Success–Methodology Executives–Attitudes
Corp. Author: Project Management Institute.
Conference: PMI Global Congress–Asia Pacific (2006 : Bangkok, Thailand)
Phys. Description: [] p. : col. ill.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 7493
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100899300
Title: The project manager’s leadership style as a success factor on projects : a literature
review Main Author: Turner, J. Rodney (John Rodney), 1953-
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Turner, J. Rodney (John Rodney), 1953-
Additional Names: Müller, Ralf.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2005
Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: The literature on general management research often identifies leadership style as a
critical success factor impacting individual and organizational performance. In this paper,
commissioned by the Project Management Institute, the authors survey the recent literature on
project management to determine whether project management researchers consider
leadership style a critical success factor when managing projects and whether they believe
leadership style impacts project outcome. This paper opens by outlining the purpose of this
study and describing the general management literature on leadership styles and
competence, specifically in relation to four elements: 20th century leadership theory; team
behavior; managerial behavior; and leadership competence. It then looks at the literature on
project management and discusses the research on the relationship between a project
manager’s leadership style and competence and their project’s outcome and success. It then
identifies and explains six points concerning the project manager leadership style and
competence that researchers have most frequently explored. The paper concludes by
detailing this review’s findings and by suggesting ideas on this topic that researchers could
further explore.
Subjects: Leadership.
Emotional intelligence.
Project Manager (PM)
Project Success.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 7027
Title: How healthy is your project? [electronic resource] (An introduction to a healthcheck
process) / Eddie Merla
Alternate Title: How healthy is your project? (An introduction to a healthcheck process)
Author(s): Merla, Eddie.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2005–North America. Proceedings, PWP07.PDF.
Contained in: PMI Global Congress 2005–North America. Proceedings.
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2005
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: The complex and dynamic nature of realizing projects–and of all the elements that
shape the project implementation process, such as technology and market demands, scope
and stakeholder management–affects the health of every project, from the smallest to the
largest. This paper discusses the common symptoms shared by all unhealthy projects, those
failing to meet budget, schedule, quality, and scope, those unable to engage stakeholders and
obtain executive commitment. In doing so, it explains the benefits of conducting period project
Healthchecks, a query-based process for gauging the state of a project’s development and
progression. It outlines self-assessment questions for project sponsors and project managers
and identifies six symptoms of unhealthy projects and the questions that project sponsors,
managers, and stakeholders should ask to analyze each symptom. It then details seven key
questions for assessing a project’s health and examines the Healthcheck process, describing
the purpose of the activities involved in its three assessment phases: what, how, and how
often. It lists several questions for conducting a project Healthcheck, questions which are
arranged into nine sections that coincide with the PMBOK® Guide’s nine Knowledge Areas.
Includes bibliographical references.
Subjects: Project–Evaluation
Conference: PMI Global Congress–North America (2005 : Toronto, Ont.)
Phys. Description: [] p.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 7253
Title: An exploratory analysis of the relationship between stakeholder management and
information technology project success / Feng-Chi Lu, Lauren Mandy, Derek C. Smith. 2004.,
14 p.
(Proceedings of PMI Research Conference 2004: RC04LU.PDF.)
The CHAOS reports from the Standish Group International (1994,1999) classify only one-third
of information technology (IT) projects as successful. The research literature argues that the
behavioral, organizational, and management issues – stakeholder management, in particular –
require urgent attention to improve this situation. This research investigates whether an IT
project management approach that focuses on the needs of stakeholders leads to an improved
degree and rate of IT project success. We develop five hypotheses to test this assertion.
While the quantitative data were useful for limited statistical testing, the qualitative data
provided rich information, offering insight into the perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors of
project managers (PMs). We determined that the level of effort expended by PMs on troubled
projects was substantially higher than on successful projects. When comparing the average
level of involvement by stakeholders in successful and challenged projects, the stakeholders
were significantly more involved in the successful projects. Our qualitative data suggests that
the nature of this involvement is particularly important. Includes bibliographical references and
illustrative matter.
CID:6626
A study of critical success factors of information system projects in China / Chao Dong, K. B.
Chuah, and Li Zhai. 2004., 15 p.
(Proceedings of PMI Research Conference 2004: RC04DONG.PDF.)
There have been many studies reported in project management literature on factors that
contribute to the success or failure of projects. However, many of the critical success factors
(CSFs) identified are too general as they tend to be derived from a wide variety of project
types and not specific to a certain class of projects; in particular, the information system (IS)
projects. Characterized by fast growth and continuing to be invested with huge amounts of
money all over the world today, IS projects have, however, suffered greatly from a high rate of
failure. Unfortunately, extensive literature review finds little effort focused specifically on the
CSFs of IS projects. China’s IS project failure rate is even worse when compared with those
in developed countries. Our recent literature review finds no published work about CSF
studies in the IS projects of China. The business and industrial environment of China is still
very different from the West. We believe that the CSFs identified in the developed countries in
the West may not be totally applicable in the same manner to the Chinese IS project
management practice and environment. To bridge this gap, this research sets out to: 1)
identify and study the major CSFs of IS projects in China; and 2) compare the differences
between these CSFs with those found in Western developed countries, namely the USA and
Canada. Includes bibliographical references.
CID:6597
Title: Using metrics as a catalyst in achieving successful project performance [electronic
resource] / Parviz F. Rad, Ginger Levin
Alternate Title: Using metrics as a catalyst in achieving successful project performance
Author(s): Rad, Parviz F., 1942-.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2004–North America. Proceedings, PMP08.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2004
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Organizations that are forward-looking and progressive in their strategic plans are
continually working to improve performance in achieving sustained success in all areas
including managing projects. If the upper management of the enterprise is focused on
achieving improved efficiency, a metrics program becomes a basic necessary business
practice. If the organization has already established a full-scale project management office,
the metrics program will be part of the overall mission of the organization. Thus the metrics
would address long-term implications of every project within the context of the long-term
strategies of organization. Metrics can help guide the organization toward informed decisions,
as they provide indicators regarding the quality, adequacy, and progress of projects,
processes, and products. Metrics can help the enterprise recognize the sum of its collective
capabilities such that achievable plans for producing and delivering products and services are
consistently realistic and achievable. Additionally, metrics can promote teamwork and improve
team morale by linking efforts of individual team members with the overall success of the
project, and ultimately the success of the organization. This paper presents a comprehensive
viewpoint on metrics and benchmarking in order to illuminate the different dimensions and
different purposes of project management metrics, albeit the ultimate goal of all metrics is to
enhance the likelihood of success of projects. Metrics will be discussed in the following
categories: enterprise, people, and things. The purpose, emphasis, and utility of each
category is highlighted and discussed. Includes bibliographical references.
Subjects: Project Success Project Management (PM)–Evaluation Performance Reporting
[Process]
Editor: Rad, Parviz F., 1942- Levin, Ginger.
Conference: PMI Global Congress–North America (2004 : Anaheim, Calif.)
Phys. Description: [] p.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 6691
Title: Surveying project success criteria [electronic resource] : what gets measured gets
managed?
Main Author: Bryde, David.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Bryde, David.
Additional Names: Bryde, David James.|Robinson, Lynne.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2004
Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: This study’s goal is twofold. First, to explore the emphasis placed on project success
criteria, through a postal survey, in order to establish whether such a survey-based research
method provides insight into why housing associations and private sector construction
companies have problems introducing new partnership-based methods. Second, to explore
whether TQM programs have an influence on the existence of customer-focused and other
stakeholder-focused project management. The survey results showed that construction
companies gave more emphasis to minimizing project cost and project duration than did the
housing associations. Conversely, housing associations placed greater emphasis on
satisfying the needs of other stakeholders than the construction companies. In terms of the
influence of a TQM program, the results suggested that those working in companies with TQM
programs were more likely to be customer-focused in the management of a project than those
lacking a TQM program. The results showed that there was no difference in emphasis
between construction companies and housing associations in terms of satisfying the
customer’s needs, meeting the technical specification, and providing a quality project
management service. There was no difference in the levels of customer or other stakeholder
focus in project management in terms of housing associations versus construction
companies, projects with internal versus external customers, TQM-type program versus no
TQM-type program. And no difference was shown in the levels of customer focus between
housing associations versus construction companies and projects with internal versus external
customers. The survey results have provided evidence that TQM program are influential in
fostering customer-focus in project environments. But just as significant is the lack of
evidence showing any influence on the level of focus on the needs and expectations of other
stakeholders. Clearly potential exists for further work in terms of understanding what the
barriers are to the management of stakeholders and what processes are needed to break
down the barriers and introduce an effective stakeholder management process.
Subjects: Project Success
Physical Description: 19 printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements:
Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 6587
Title Statement: Knowing right from wrong [electronic resource] : what research tells us about ways to increase the chances for project success / Marv Goldstein.
Main Author – Personal: Goldstein, Marv.
Journal Citation: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2001,
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2001
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Project managers and executives have both long searched for a method to determine the value of practicing project management. And what most have come to rely on are financial measures that gauge project success based on the return on investment (ROI) the initiative generates. This paper argues that project managers and executives should instead determine project value according to the discipline’s capacity to increase the project team’s chances of realizing projects as planned. In doing so, it puts forward three attributes of project failure and three attributes of project success. It then examines five studies (i.e., The Standish Group, KPMG) that identify the reasons causing project failure. It also details the common business and behavioral competency failures that the Gartner Group, in its study, consider common to all failed projects. It subsequently describes the results of ten other studies: these recognize the reasons determining project success. This paper concludes by putting forward three attributes that can help project managers increase their chances of realizing projects as planned; it closes by pointing out two enablers that are necessary for creating a project environment in which project managers can use the three above-mentioned attributes.
Subjects: Project Success
Conference Names: PMI Seminars & Symposium (2001 : Nashville, Tenn.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 693
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100219300&iss=1

Title Statement: First and foremost : mind your own business / Neal Whitten
Main Author – Personal: Whitten, Neal.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 14, no. 7 (July 2000), p. 21.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: This article advises that employees focus on their domains of responsibility–the
responsibilities and commitments that fall with the scope of their assignments–to best foster
the success of the company. Those actions that must be performed in order to successfully
complete commitments fall within one’s domain of responsibility and can lead to company
success through sustained accomplishments.
Subjects: Success in business|Project Success
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 2760
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100426000&iss=1

Title Statement: Developing superior project teams : a study of the characteristics of high performance in project teams / Edward J. Hoffman, Claire S. Kinlaw, and Dennis C. Kinlaw.
Main Author – Personal: Hoffman, Edward J. (Edward Jay), 1959-
Journal Citation: PMI Research Conference 2000. Proceedings, p. 29-35.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Despite the close relationship between project management and teams, there is little literature about team development in the context of project work. Throughout much of the history of project management the majority of the work has focused on the tools and techniques, as opposed to the human side, which typically has been covered quickly. Furthermore, much of the team development material covered has emphasized findings pertaining to non-project organizations. This original study explores the relationship between project success and team development, identifies the characteristics of superior project teams, and indicates the behaviors associated with project managers of high performing teams.
Subjects: Develop Project Team [Process]|Project Success.
Additional Names: Kinlaw, Claire S.|Kinlaw, Dennis C.
Conference Names: PMI Research Conference (2000 : Paris, France)
Physical Description: [] printed p. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 2964
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100446400&iss=1


Title Statement: The role of project management software in project management process and project success / Janis Grevins, Lawrence G. Sanders, Nallan Suresh.
Main Author – Personal: Grevins, Janis.
Journal Citation: PMI Research Conference 2000. Proceedings, p. 265-270.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: There are many software tools that are specialized to varying degrees in project management, as well as numerous general business software packages that support project management. However, there have been no empirical studies that investigate software use in project management. This research investigated the factors that influence the effects of such software on project success and also addressed how project management software affects process efficiency. The paper presents a theoretical model to investigate the effects of project characteristics, project management team characteristics and user training satisfaction on the uses of project management software.
Subjects: Project Management Software [Tool]|Project Success.
Additional Names: Sanders, Lawrence G.|Suresh, Nallan C.
Conference Names: PMI Research Conference (2000 : Paris, France)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 2999
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100449900&iss=1

Title Statement: The new face of the project team member / Donna K. Burnette, David Hutchens
Main Author – Personal: Burnette, Donna K.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 14, no. 11 (Nov. 2000), p. 61-63.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: There is a trend in project management to evaluate project success quickly and superficially. The criteria for real success goes beyond simply asking if the project came in on time and under budget. Trends indicate a changing profile of those people who are choosen to lead projects. This article offers a new paradigm for project management, expanding the static categories of time, cost, and scope. It includes strategic thinking, continual reassessment of risks and opportunities, and sensitivity to stakeholders. Tips are offered on communicating project management principles, as the skill-building approach yields to a more holistic and integrated, culture-creation approach.
Subjects: Develop Project Team [Process]|Project Success
Additional Names: Hutchens, David.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 1408
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100290800&iss=1


Title Statement: The key to survival on projects : knowledge or awareness? / Paul C. Dinsmore
Main Author – Personal: Dinsmore, Paul C.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 14, no. 12 (Dec. 2000), p. 21-22.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: This brief article discusses the dimensions of knowledge (project management and general management knowledge) and awareness (personal, organizational, and global awareness) that impact project success.
Subjects: Project Management (PM)|Project Success
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 2726
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100422600&iss=1


Title Statement: Risk management — why? / Elden F. Jones II
Main Author – Personal: Jones, Elden F., II.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 14, no. 2 (Feb. 2000), p. 39-42.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Risk management (RM) is a method of ensuring that, for a specific project, all risk events are identified, qualified, and handled. The article, relying on the principles of the PMBOK® Guide, overviews the concepts used in RM, provides definitions of key terms, and explains how RM can be used in a disciplined way to add value to a project and increase its probability of success. Decision trees and Monte Carlo simulations are discussed as two approaches to qualified risk analysis. Once the RM process has been completed, it is important to maintain the risk set, and review and adjust it periodically.
Subjects: Risk Management Planning [Process]|Decision Tree Analysis [Technique]|Simulation
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 1086
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100258600&iss=1

Title Statement: Enhancing drug development planning through the use of facilitated planning [electronic resource] / Martin D. Hynes III … [et al.].
Journal Citation: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2000, 20419.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: The development of new drugs is a long, complex and costly process. Given these factors, it is important to have a well thought-out and documented drug development plan. Historically, a variety of different approaches have been utilized to build these plans with variable success. During the past year, we have dramatically changed our approach to the planning of new drug development activities. These changes have focused on a facilitated “rolling wave” approach to planning which includes building a detailed plan to the next major milestone. A higher level plan to milestones that are further out is also developed.|These detailed plans are created during intensive sessions which are usually several days in duration. The development plans are built by a cross-functional group of scientists and project managers assigned to the drug development team. These team members are supported by trained facilitators who assist the team in the development and documentation of the plan. These facilitated planning sessions include the following activities:|1. A review of background scientific and development data.|2. Developing an in-depth understanding of each team member’s roles and responsibilities during the drug development process.|3. The development of Critical Success Factors that provide the basis for decision making as the project progresses.|4. The development of a detailed timeline to the next major milestone utilizing critical path methodology and a high level timeline to future milestones, i.e., in|IND or NDA submission.|5. A risk management evaluation which identifies major risks for which prevention and contingency plans are created.|The development plan is documented in a Program Team Plan which includes a Microsoft Project timeline and budget spreadsheets. This document is approved by a management committee and serves as the team’s guide for all activities through the next major milestone. This document is then published to the global development organization.|The benefits of these facilitated planning sessions include:|1. The intensive time spent during the session leads to a reduced time for plan development.|2. A high level of interaction leads to greater ownership of the plan by the cross-functional team members.|3. Team members obtain a greater understanding of key hand-offs and cross-functional dependencies in the plan.|4. The overall quality of planning is greatly improved.|5. The interactive, cross-functional team building leads to higher performing teams.|6. Increased probability of achieving the milestones as described in the plan.|This presentation will review the objectives and deliverables of these facilitated planning sessions. It will also review the processes used to meet these objectives and deliverables. The presentation will also review implementation suggestions for those companies who are interested in initiating these intensive facilitated planning sessions.
Subjects: Drug development.|Pharmaceutical industry.|Cross-functional teams.|Project Success|Milestone Schedule [Tool]|Risk assessment
Additional Names: Hynes, Martin D.|Konechnik, Thomas J.|Burris, Sheryl L.|Broughton, M. Christine (Mary Christine)|French, Stephanie A.
Conference Names: PMI Seminars & Symposium (2000 : Houston, Tex.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Additional authors: Thomas J. Konechnik, Sheryl L. Burris, Mary Chris Broughton, Stephanie A. French.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 1444
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100294400&iss=1

Title Statement: Staging a project–are you setting your project up for success [electronic

resource]? / B. Elenbaas.
Main Author – Personal: Elenbaas, B.
Journal Citation: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2000, 20336.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: It’s been said the potential for success of a project is determined on the very first
day. While perhaps slightly overstated when placed in the twenty-four hour timeframe, the
launch or staging of a project and near-immediate establishment of a project environment
supportive of the dynamics of a large scale project initiative will often determine whether or not
a project has the potential for success. Stated different, a project launched poorly in an
environment non-conducive to supporting it will invariably fail, despite the subsequent and
perhaps heroic efforts of project management and project team personnel.|Despite the
criticality of a good project launch, and despite general realization by project managers of its
importance, surveys of troubled projects continue to identify ineffective project startup as one
of the root causes of project failure. This paper (and presentation) will first establish why a
successful project launch is so challenging, despite what are often tremendous efforts by
project management to establish the project on ‘the right footing’. More importantly, it will
provide a project initiation framework in the form of project start-up “must have’s and must
do’s” to guide project managers through the often-chaotic initial staging of a project. This
Project Start-up Checklist is appropriate to projects of various types, performed in various
contexts (internal/external/consulting engagement; public or private sector), and is
independent of project size or organizational culture. By providing a relatively succinct
‘checklist’ of key items to address in Project Initiation, project managers can plan their project
start-up to ensure what needs to be done gets done in the relatively short project start-up
‘window’.|The Project Start-Up Checklist consists of ten items, each of which will be identified,
defined and qualified in the paper. Each checklist item is positioned as the responsibility of
the project manager to effectively execute, with qualification as to why each is deemed so
critical by the presenter to complete or establish very early in the project life cycle.|Because
time is always a factor on projects, exacerbated by the need to establish a healthy project
environment quickly (upon which the execution of project control processes is often
predicated), applied and proven techniques, approaches, and tips to support the timely
completion of each item on the Project Start-Up Checklist will be included in the actual
Conference presentation of the paper. It will be presented with a number of discussion points
wherein the audience will have opportunity to provide comments confirming the fundamental
importance of the items presented in our Project Start-Up Checklist, as well as confirming the
applicability and practicality of the techniques presented.|This paper takes a very pragmatic
approach to executing a successful project start-up, with information garnered from many
projects in multiple organizations. It does not take the ‘in the perfect world’ position which
typically suggests the completion of a comprehensive set of deliverables in Project Start-up
before Project Execution may commence. The fact is projects are more-often-than-not
initiated in a rather ill-planned (i.e. from a business not project planning perspective), chaotic
fashion, and typically with immense pressure placed on the project manager to ‘get going on
the real work at hand’. The material presented will not only assist project managers in surviving
the project start-up, but doing so in a manner which sets the project up for success while
building project management credibility in the process.
Subjects: Initiating Processes [Process Group]|Project Success.
Conference Names: PMI Seminars & Symposium (2000 : Houston, Tex.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 1369
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100286900&iss=1

Title Statement: Proving the profits / Bud Baker
Main Author – Personal: Baker, Bud.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 14, no. 12 (Dec. 2000), p. 19.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2000
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: This brief article discusses a 1986 paper by Larson and Gobelli (“The Barriers
Affecting Project Success,” Project Management Journal)which correlated project success
(defined as degree of meeting cost, schedule, and performance objectives) with project
structure as differentiated by the amount of authority granted to the project manager. The full
project structure, in which the project manger had the greatest authority, also showed the
greatest probablity for project success.
Subjects: Project Success–Evaluation
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 2725
http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100422500&iss=1

Title: How healthy is your project? / Paul S. Royer
Author(s): Royer, Paul S.
Journal Citation: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2000,
Contained in: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2000.
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2000
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Even the most meticulously planned and managed projects can get into difficulties

as they are an integration of people, processes and plans in an ever-changing environment.
In most situations it would be very valuable to have a method to assess its current state and
continued viability. This presentation offers a proven, non-quantitative technique for analyzing
a project’s health and potential risks. The technique follows the precepts of project
management outlined in the PMI PMBOK® Guide and adheres closely to the process
guidelines of SEI’s Capability Maturity Model. It was initially developed for the State of
Washington’s (US) Year 2000 Risk Assessment Program and used to assess state agency
and university’s Y2K information technology mitigation efforts. Several private consulting firms
worked with the state’s Department of Information Services to develop the program and project
risk assessment criteria and procedure. The technique was modified and extended within my
organization and used to conduct risk assessments for both Y2K and non-Y2K projects and
programs in the public and private sectors. The technique has been used successfully to
assess both information technology and construction projects and is easily adaptable to any
project environment. Central to the technique is a set of ten risk assessment factors (RAF)
used to evaluate the effectiveness of management, planning, resource, and other processes
essential to a project’s success. The ten risk assessment factors are: 1. The project is
appropriately organized (Organization). 2. Project risks are identified and appropriately
managed (Risk Management). 3. The project is appropriately planned (Planning). 4. Project
milestones are being met on schedule (Milestones). 5. The project status is appropriately
monitored and adequately controlled (Monitoring and Control). 6. The project scope is
appropriately controlled (Scope Management). 7. The project is appropriately resourced
(Resources). 8. Appropriate functional acceptance-testing processes and plans are in place
(Functional Testing). 9. Appropriate capacity and performance acceptance-testing processes
and plans are in place (Capacity and Performance Testing). 10. Appropriate and timely
training is available (Training). Depending on the project type and environment, these risk
assessment factors may require modification or extension. Includes illustrative matter.
Subjects: Risk assessment Project Success Project Schedule [Output/Input] Deliverable
[Output/Input]
Conference: PMI Seminars & Symposium (2000 : Houston, Tex.)
Phys. Description: computer data (1 file : kb)
Notes: Title from opening screen. [] printed p. System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v.
5.
CID: 1474
Title Statement: The logical framework method for defining project success / David Baccarini.
Main Author – Personal: Baccarini, David.
Journal Citation: Project management journal. Vol. 30, no. 4 (Dec. 1999), p. 25-32.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 1999
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Project success is a core concept of project management but its definition remains
elusive. The project team must have a clear understanding of their project success objectives.
This paper uses the logical framework method (LFM) as a foundation for defining project
success. Using LFM, four levels of project objectives are identified: goal, purpose, output, and
input. It is proposed that project success consists of two components-product success and
project management success. Product success deals with goal and purpose; project
management success deals with outputs and inputs.
Subjects: Project Success–Evaluation–Methodology.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., port. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 472
Title Statement: Measuring project success / Mark Freeman, Peter Beale.
Main Author – Personal: Freeman, Mark.
Journal Citation: Project management journal. Vol. 23, no. 1 (Mar. 1992), p. 8-17.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Drexel Hill, Pa.
Publication Date: 1992
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Measuring the success of a project can be difficult in that success means something
different to each person involved in the project. In an effort to determine measures of
performance to define success, a method of measuring success objectively was developed. A
literature search revealed seven common criteria were used to measure success: technical
performance, efficiency of project execution, managerial and organizational implications,
personal growth, project termination, technical innovativeness, and manufacturability and
business performance. Limited to the viewpoints of the sponsor and the project manager, and
consistent with the discounted cash flow (DCF) principles, a common focus was found in
financial factors for evaluating success of a business venture.
Subjects: Project Success–Evaluation.|Project Performance–Measurement.
Additional Names: Beale, Peter.
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
CID: 5400
Other related PMI literature can be found at this link: 
eReads & Reference
Improving Your Project Management Skills by Larry Richman  AMACOM © 2006 (223 pages) ISBN:0814408753 Chapter 1: The Core Concepts (OTHER DEFINITIONS – “Critical Success Factors” defined)

Project Manager’s Spotlight on Risk Management  by Kim Heldman  Sybex © 2005 (224

pages) ISBN:078214411X
Chapter 4: Preventing Scope and Schedule Risks (Scope Risk)  Critical Success Factors
(defined)

Strategic Management: From Theory to Implementation, Fourth Edition  by David Hussey Butterworth-Heinemann © 1998 (704 pages) ISBN:0750638494 Chapter 10: Analysing the industry and competitors (Critical success factors – defined)

Building Customer-Based Project Organizations by Jeffrey K. Pinto and Pekka J. Rouhiainen John Wiley & Sons © 2001 (220 pages) ISBN:0471385093
Chapter Four: Project Critical Success Factors  (Additional Research on Project Critical

Success Factors)  (Critical Success Factors— A 10-Factor Model)

Mastering Virtual Teams: Strategies, Tools, and Techniques That Succeed, Second Edition by Deborah L. Duarte and Nancy Tennant Snyder  Jossey-Bass © 2001 (232 pages)

ISBN:0787955892
Chapter One: Critical Success Factors
Aligning Information Technology with Corporate Strategy by American Productivity & Quality Center  APQC © 1999 (62 pages) ISBN:1928593194
Section Two: Guiding IT Projects to Success (Finding 7)

Web-site links

PMI – Measuring the Value of Success Project Management Organizations, Chapter 4: The
Findings By Robert Cook (2004) http://www.pmi.org/PDF/pp_robertcook.pdf
Mindtools – Critical Success Factors: Identifying the things that really matter for success
TechRepublic – Use a balanced scorecard to declare success on your project
by Tom Mochal
http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10878_11-6066840.html
StickyMinds – Three Numbers to Measure Project Performance By Thomas Liedtke/Peter
Paetzold
Project Perfect – Measuring Project Health Rating By Neville Turbit

PMSolutions – Measuring and Managing Success: IT Project Metrics By Karen White
Johnson, Jim, Karen D. Boucher, Kyle Connors, and James Robinson. 2001. Project management: collaborating on Project success. Software Magazine (Feb./Mar.). Online: http://www.softwaremag.com/archive/2001feb/CollaborativeMgt.html
Best Management – Project Success Rates http://www.bestmanagement.ca/pm_success.html
IBM – Software development productivity and project success rates: Are we attacking the right problem?  By Joe Marasco, CEO, Ravenflow http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/feb06/marasco/index.html
Dr. Dobbs -   Defining Success: There are lessons to be learned when defining IT project
success By Scott W. Ambler
2JVN – page 1)  Defining Success (http://www.ddj.com/architect/202800777?pgno=2
PROJECT SUCCESS AND FAILURE: WHAT IS SUCCESS, WHAT IS FAILURE, AND HOW CAN YOU IMPROVE YOUR ODDS FOR SUCCESS? By Robert Frese http://www.umsl.edu/~sauter/analysis/6840_f03_papers/frese/ (2003)
ACS Professional Development – A Report on Project Failure and Success Factors
Avoca – Project Success Prediction Based On Communication Reliability Analysis
http://www.avocallc.de/downloads/CommunicationReliability.pdf
Abstract: This paper introduces a novel method to predict project success probability based
on the analysis of communication reliability. The method is simple to understand and easy to
apply. The method has the important advantages that it shows quantitatively what otherwise
might only be assumed based on project staff experience or wisdom and that it can be applied
well before project launch. The concepts of communication reliability and communication
distance form the basis of the method. Communication reliability measures the success rate
of communication transactions between project participants. Communication distance
measures communication inhibition with regard to the following five factors project geography,
project focus, team cohesion, team experience and process capability. To evaluate the
communication reliability the overall communication distance is determined based on
estimates for those five dimensions.

Books: (May be obtained via book dealer of choice, or perhaps through your library)

Improving Your Project Management Skills by Larry Richman  AMACOM © 2006 (223 pages)

ISBN:0814408753
Chapter 1: The Core Concepts (OTHER DEFINITIONS – “Critical Success Factors” defined)

Project Manager’s Spotlight on Risk Management  by Kim Heldman  Sybex © 2005 (224

pages) ISBN:078214411X
Chapter 4: Preventing Scope and Schedule Risks (Scope Risk)  Critical Success Factors
(defined)

Strategic Management: From Theory to Implementation, Fourth Edition  by David Hussey

Butterworth-Heinemann © 1998 (704 pages) ISBN:0750638494
Chapter 10: Analysing the industry and competitors (Critical success factors – defined)

Building Customer-Based Project Organizations by Jeffrey K. Pinto and Pekka J. Rouhiainen

John Wiley & Sons © 2001 (220 pages) ISBN:0471385093
Chapter Four: Project Critical Success Factors  (Additional Research on Project Critical
Success Factors)  (Critical Success Factors— A 10-Factor Model)

Mastering Virtual Teams: Strategies, Tools, and Techniques That Succeed, Second Edition

by Deborah L. Duarte and Nancy Tennant Snyder  Jossey-Bass © 2001 (232 pages)
ISBN:0787955892
Chapter One: Critical Success Factors
Aligning Information Technology with Corporate Strategy by American Productivity & Quality
Center  APQC © 1999 (62 pages) ISBN:1928593194
Section Two: Guiding IT Projects to Success (Finding 7)
Non PMI literature (May be obtained via document delivery service of choice, or perhaps

through your library).
Evaluation of Three Methods to Predict Project Success: A Case Study
Book Series Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Publisher Springer Berlin / Heidelberg
ISSN 0302-9743 (Print) 1611-3349 (Online)
Volume Volume 3547/2005
Book Product Focused Software Process Improvement
DOI 10.1007/b137178
Copyright 2005
ISBN 978-3-540-26200-8
Category Experimental Software Engineering
DOI 10.1007/11497455_31
Pages 385-398
Subject Collection Computer Science
SpringerLink Date Monday, June 20, 2005
Claes Wohlin1  and Anneliese Amschler Andrews2
(1)  Dept. of Systems and Software Engineering, School of Engineering, Blekinge Institute of
Technology, Box 520 SE-372 25 Ronneby, Sweden
(2)  School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University,
Pullman, WA 99164-2752, USA
Abstract
To increase the likelihood for software project success, it is important to be able to identify the
drivers of success. This paper compares three methods to identify similar projects with the
objective to predict project success. The hypothesis is that projects with similar characteristics
are likely to have the same outcome in terms of success. Two of the methods are based on
identifying similar projects using all available information. The first method of these aims at
identifying the most similar project. The second method identifies a group of projects as most
similar. Finally, the third method pinpoints some key characteristics to identify project
similarity. Our measure of success for these identifications is whether project success for
these projects identified as similar is the same. The comparison between methods is done in a
case study with 46 projects with varying characteristics. The paper evaluates the performance
of each method with regards to its ability to predict project success. The method using key
drivers of project success is superior to the others in the case study. Thus, it is concluded
that it is important for software developing organizations to identify its key project
characteristics to improve its control over project success.

E. S. Andersen, D. Birchall, S.A Jessen, A. H. Money (2006) Exploring project success.
Baltic Journal of Management, Vol.1,No.2, p 127-147.
Abstract:  The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between project success
factors and actual project success. It reports on an investigation into those factors within the
direct influence of project managers that can make a real difference to the outcome of project
endeavours. Design/methodology/approach – Using principal components analysis (PCA) on
60 questions about actual project work performance collected from four culturally different
regions (UK, France, Norway and China), nine distinctively different critical success factors
were found. Similarly, using PCA on ten project success items, three distinctively different
project success criteria were extracted. Findings – The most important factors in improving
managerial ability to deliver results in time and at cost were strong project commitment, early
stakeholder influence, stakeholder endorsement of project plans and rich project
communications. To secure project impact, strong project commitment and rich project
communications were the main contributors. A well-structured and formal project approach
and well understood and accepted project purpose, implying high quality management, also
scored high. Captured experience was best supported by a well-structured and formal project
approach and rich project communications. Practical implications – As the project approach
increases as a means for implementing strategic goals, project managers should devote
increasing energies into rich communication both within the project and towards the project
environment. Originality/value- The study is cross-cultural. It shows that successful project
management, regardless of cultural differences, still depends on “hard features” such as
professional planning and cost control, but that “soft skills” such as rich communication and
learning from experience are prerequisites for project management to achieve superior
Factors influencing project success: the impact of human resource management  By Adnane
Belout and Clothilde Gauvreau in International Journal of Project ManagementVolume 22,
Issue 1, January 2004, Pages 1-11
Abstract:  Today, human resource management (HRM) is being renewed in organizations and
gradually affirming its strategic role. However, the results of an empirical study conducted by
Pinto and Prescott [Journal of Management 14 (1988) 5] within a context of project
management, contradict this trend. These authors concluded that the “Personnel factor” was
the only factor in their research that was marginal for project success. This paper attempts to
retest their conclusions in rethinking issues of validity of the measures used in their study. In
line with research by Tsui [Human Resource Management 26 (1987) 35; Administrative
Science Quarterly 35 (1990) 458] and some of Belout’s recommendation [International
Journal of Project Management 16(1) (1998) 21], the construct validity of the human
resources factor has been examined and a model proposed. Results show, first of all, that
although there was a link between project success and the Personnel factor (based on the
correlation analyses), this factor did not have a significant impact on project success. Our
results tend also to confirm that the relationships between the independent variables and
project success will vary according to life cycle stage. The results also show that for three
distinct structures (functional, project-based and matrix), the Management Support and
Trouble-shooting variables were significantly correlated with success. Finally, this study
confirm a moderating effect between the independent variables and project success,
depending on the sector studied. All in all, this research adds another step in conceptualizing
HRM in project context which is still very rudimental. In this sense, researchers should, in the
future, improve the construct validity of the Personnel variable by improving the psychometric
properties of the questionnaires used in the project management context. This study also
shows the problem of multicolinearity, which appears to be excessive in the use of PIP.
Finally, a fundamental question is posed: does HRM in the context of project management
have specific characteristics that make its role, social responsibility and operation different
from the so-called traditional HRM?
doi:10.1016/S0263-7863(03)00003-6

The Influence of Project Managers on Project Success Criteria and Project Success by Type

_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersio
n=0&_userid=10&md5=1c413a7b73559901f30c9e84b72c7f49
Abstract
The importance attached by project managers to project success criteria and the associated
rates of project success were assessed for different types of projects, industries and traits of
project managers. 959 responses to a web-based survey showed that importance attached to
project success criteria and project success rates differ by industry, project complexity and
the age and nationality of the project manager. However, the underlying criteria are different
and are explained herein. Modeling the relationship between importance assigned to success
criteria and reported project success against these criteria showed a link between importance
and actual achievements. Managerial and theoretical implications are discussed.

FAILURE

PMI Marketplace


PMI literature

Title Statement: Seven causes of project failure [electronic resource] : how to recognize them and how to initiate project recovery / Richard Discenza, James B. Forman.
Main Author – Personal: Discenza, Richard.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2007–North America. Proceedings, ADV26.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2007
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Each year, organizations around the world expend much of their resources in implementing projects that ultimately fail for reasons complex and oftentimes, for reasons simple. This paper examines how organizations can recognize the signs of project failure and how they can save failing projects. In doing so, it describes seven reasons that the authors have identified as most often causing project failure. It categorizes these reasons into one of three factor-based categories–people, processes, and communications–and outlines a five-phase process for assessing failing projects, noting this process’s primary concepts, variables, and activities. It also lists the assessment team’s key areas of focus when performing project assessments. It then discusses an approach for assessing a project, explaining the processes involved in administering and analyzing project-related questionnaires, conducting interviews with project team members, and articulating and presenting the assessment’s findings. Accompanying this paper is a 20-question survey that the authors developed to gather–from key project team members–vital information about failing projects.
Subjects: Project Success.|Project Risk Management [Knowledge Area]
Additional Names: Forman, James B.
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2007 : Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : col. ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 8870      http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101042800&iss=1

Title Statement: The afterlife / by Peter Fretty.
Main Author – Personal: Fretty, Peter.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 21, no. 8 (Aug. 2007), p. 40-45.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2007
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Project mistakes are forgivable only when the project manager responsible for the mistakes learns from the failure and uses the knowledge gained to better manage future projects. This article discusses the upside of project failure, of how failure can help inexperienced project managers acquire the knowledge, competencies, and wisdom they need to manage future project assignments of increasing complexity. In doing so, it overviews why failures occur and how project managers can control the damage that failures generate. It also identifies how project managers can extract from their failures the learning that each has to offer. It then outlines a three-step recovery process that project managers coming off failed projects can use to gain the trust and respect of their future project teams and future project stakeholders.
Subjects: Project Success.|Failure (Psychology)|Lessons Learned [Output/Input]
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : col. ports. ; 28 cm.
CID: 8782       http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101035800&iss=1

Title Statement: Crunch time / by Tom Sullivan.
Main Author – Personal: Sullivan, Tom.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 21, no. 12 (Dec. 2007), p. 48-53.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2007
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: All project managers know the demands–both the professional and the personal–of working against tight schedules. But when project managers and project teams must continuously work overtime to meet unrealistic deadlines, they will not only lose interest in their work, they will often burnout. Some may also express dissent; some may leave. Many will probably perform below their abilities. This article discusses how project managers can avoid the pressure of continuously working long hours to meet tight deadlines. In doing so, it describes several approaches that project managers have successfully used to keep their projects on-track without over-burdening their project teams. It also overviews some of the reasons that can cause a project to slip behind schedule. It then identifies a few of the issues and tactics that can help project managers better manage their project schedules. Accompanying this article is a sidebar listing ten factors that most often cause project failure.
Subjects: Project Success.|Project Time Management [Knowledge Area]
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : col. ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
CID: 8924     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00101055100&iss=1

Title: Why do projects really fail?
Author(s): Fretty, Peter.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 20, no. 3 (Mar. 2006), p. 44-48.
Contained in: PM network. Vol. 20, no. 3 (Mar. 2006)
Publisher: Project Management Institute,
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Published: 2006
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: The reality of the project management field is that some projects will fail. But some of these failures are easily avoidable. This article examines how organizations can avoid failure. In doing so, it describes what organizations can easily do to more successfully manage projects and how organizations can more effectively save failing projects. It identifies the key signs of failing projects and the common–and unsuccessful–ways of dealing with failure. It then outlines a four-step system for finding the cause of a project’s failure and a method that can help organizations salvage failing projects. It concludes by identifying an approach that can help organizations shift the way they think about–and mitigate–project failure. Accompanying this article are two sidebars: The first lists six signs indicating project failure and five methods for avoiding failure; the second identifies the top ten factors causing IT project failure.
Subjects: Project Risk Management [Knowledge Area] Failure (Psychology)
Corp. Author: Project Management Institute.
Phys. Description: [] p. : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 28 cm.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 7560      http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100906000&iss=1

Title: A case study of project and stakeholder management failures : lessons learned
Main Author: Sutterfield, J. Scott.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Sutterfield, J. Scott.
Additional Names: Friday-Stroud, Shawnta S.|Shivers-Blackwell, Sheryl L.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2006
Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: The standard process used by the United States (US) Department of Defense (DOD) to implement its projects is highly complex: It involves numerous and varying structural, behavioral, and environmental factors, including the simultaneous management of competing stakeholders. This article examines the lessons learned from a failed DOD project–the Lighter Amphibian Heavy-Lift (LAMP-H) vehicle–so as to outline a framework known as the project stakeholder management (PSM) strategy. In doing so, it defines stakeholder theory, project stakeholders, and the PSM’s purpose; it overviews LAMP-H’s development and subsequent failure, explaining the opposing stakeholder views about the vehicle’s operability as well as the project manager’s attempts to define the project’s scope and build stakeholder consensus; it also looks at the US Army’s organizational restructuring and describes how this change led to the LAMP-H project’s failure. It then details–in relation to the existing literature–six lessons learned from this project and discusses the nine steps involved in implementing PSM.
Subjects: Failure (Psychology)
Stakeholder–Management–Case studies.
Project Management (PM)–Case studies.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 8394     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100989400

Title: Understanding project failure : using cognitive mapping in an insurance project
Main Author: Robertson, Stephen.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Robertson, Stephen.
Additional Names: Williams, Terry.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2006
Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Failure is a common outcome of complex projects. To understand project failure and learn from such mistakes to improve future performance, many organizations institute lessons-learned sessions during and after their projects. But such sessions often miss the deeper reasons why projects fail, reasons often more clearly identified through modeling approaches like cognitive mapping. This article examines how organizations can use cognitive mapping to identify a project’s causal chains and understand the causes of a project’s failure. In doing so, it reviews the literature on the root causes of project failure and the need to learn from projects; it identifies four dimensions of project success, three factors for managing projects successfully, and eight factors of project failure. It reviews research on why organizations frequently fail to learn from projects and on how organizations can learn from projects by using cognitive mapping and system dynamics. It then uses cognitive mapping to analyze the failure of a software project for an insurance company. It explains the study’s findings and the two types of cognitive maps–pre-launch maps and post-launch maps–that the authors developed to assess this project, maps that evaluate such performance elements as feedback loops, trigger events, central concepts, and outcomes. It recommends how the insurance company can best implement–and learn from–future projects and improve its learning processes.
Subjects: Project Success.
Information technology projects.
Cognitive maps (Psychology)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 8068    http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100956800


Title Statement: Project failure–12 mistakes to avoid [electronic resource] / Dennis Sommer.
Main Author – Personal: Sommer, Dennis.
Journal Citation: PMI Global Congress 2004–North America. Proceedings, PMP05.PDF.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2004
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Although The Standish Group’s Chaos Report (2003) showed–in comparison to its previous findings–that over the past decade, a greater number of projects did achieve a successful outcome, it also revealed that two out of three present-day projects usually fail. This paper examines twelve reasons why projects fail, reasons that the author identified through roundtable discussions with information technology (IT) professionals and business executives. It defines each reason and explains the obstacles causing each problem. It also suggests actions that project professionals can implement to possibly prevent these mistakes from occurring.
Subjects: Risk Identification [Process]|Project Risk Management [Knowledge Area]
Conference Names: PMI Global Congress–North America (2004 : Anaheim, Calif.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 6688     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100818800&iss=1


An exploratory analysis of the relationship between stakeholder management and information technology project success
Feng-Chi Lu, Lauren Mandy, Derek C. Smith. 2004., 14 p.
(Proceedings of PMI Research Conference 2004: RC04LU.PDF.)
The CHAOS reports from the Standish Group International (1994,1999) classify only one-third of information technology (IT) projects as successful. The research literature argues that the behavioral, organizational, and management issues – stakeholder management, in particular – require urgent attention to improve this situation. This research investigates whether an IT project management approach that focuses on the needs of stakeholders leads to an improved degree and rate of IT project success. We develop five hypotheses to test this assertion. While the quantitative data were useful for limited statistical testing, the qualitative data provided rich information, offering insight into the perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors of project managers (PMs). We determined that the level of effort expended by PMs on troubled projects was substantially higher than on successful projects. When comparing the average level of involvement by stakeholders in successful and challenged projects, the stakeholders were significantly more involved in the successful projects. Our qualitative data suggests that the nature of this involvement is particularly important. Includes bibliographical references and illustrative matter.
CID:6626    http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100812600&iss=1


The need to fail / by Neal Whitten
Newtown Square, PA Project Management Institute; 2004, [] p. : col. port. ; 28 cm.
(Viewpoints. Leadership) PM network. Vol. 18, no. 11 (Nov. 2004), p. 24
The author discusses the experience of failure as a vital and necessary part of one’s development as a professional and as a leader. He asserts that failure is an opportunity to obtain the wisdom that makes future professional success possible.
CID:7094  http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100859400&iss=1

Title Statement: Knowing right from wrong [electronic resource] : what research tells us about ways to increase the chances for project success / Marv Goldstein.
Main Author – Personal: Goldstein, Marv.
Journal Citation: PMI Seminars & Symposium. Proceedings, 2001,
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 2001
Material Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: Project managers and executives have both long searched for a method to determine the value of practicing project management. And what most have come to rely on are financial measures that gauge project success based on the return on investment (ROI) the initiative generates. This paper argues that project managers and executives should instead determine project value according to the discipline’s capacity to increase the project team’s chances of realizing projects as planned. In doing so, it puts forward three attributes of project failure and three attributes of project success. It then examines five studies (i.e., The Standish Group, KPMG) that identify the reasons causing project failure. It also details the common business and behavioral competency failures that the Gartner Group, in its study, consider common to all failed projects. It subsequently describes the results of ten other studies: these recognize the reasons determining project success. This paper concludes by putting forward three attributes that can help project managers increase their chances of realizing projects as planned; it closes by pointing out two enablers that are necessary for creating a project environment in which project managers can use the three above-mentioned attributes.
Subjects: Project Success
Conference Names: PMI Seminars & Symposium (2001 : Nashville, Tenn.)
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|Includes bibliographical references.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
CID: 693     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100219300&iss=1

Title: Top reasons projects fail [electronic resource]
Main Author: Mulcahy, Rita.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Mulcahy, Rita.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 1999
Type: Conference paper
Language: English
Abstract: If only 26% of all projects succeed, then having a failed project is not a remote possibility. This presentation will tell you some of the reasons projects fail and also help you uncover ways to prevent it from happening to your projects. Come join an inspiring, insightful, and humorous look at why projects fail and how to prevent it.
Subjects: Project Success.
Failure (Psychology)
Physical Description: [] printed p.
Notes: Title from opening screen.|System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader v. 5.
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 2194     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100369400

Title Statement: Uh-oh. it’s a computer systems project… a project management approach designed to sidestep the high IT project failure rate / Alan Bailey
Main Author – Personal: Bailey, Alan.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 12, no. 8 (Aug. 1998), p. 29-34.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Newtown Square, Pa.
Publication Date: 1998
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Computer system implementations have a high failure rate. This article proposes a methodology which accounts for common mistakes in these projects. Planning approaches can be divided into planning which is structured, and planning which is looser and iterative. Both approaches offer advantages and disadvantages, but it is more important to manage risks, understand the nature of the intended change, and have clear business objectives that are specific and measurable. A balanced use of linear, exploratory, and personal management approaches can be used to avoid the usual overemphasis in computer systems on tangible factors at the expense of conceptual and personal effects. It is possible to plan computer-related projects in a way that is realistic and practical by using a flexible approach which, while not totally precise, provides a clearer view of achievable goals.
Subjects: Information technology.|Systems engineering|Project Management (PM)–Planning
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 2159     http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100365900&iss=1

Title Statement: Twelve ways to get the least from yourself and your project / Jeffrey K. Pinto
Main Author – Personal: Pinto, Jeffrey K.
Journal Citation: PM network. Vol. 11, no. 5 (May 1997), p. 29-31.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Upper Darby, Pa.
Publication Date: 1997
Material Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: This article, excerpted from What Made Gertie Gallop? Learning From Project Failures, discusses twelve important contributing causes of project failure: 1) ignoring the project environment; 2) pushing a new technology to market prematurely; 3) neglecting to build a fallback position; 4) sanctioning key personnel for problems; 5) neglecting new ideas; 6) failing to conduct feasibility studies; 7) an unwillingness to admit failure; icon cool PMI's Knowledge &amp; Wisdom Center. overmanaging the project and team; 9) failing to conduct post-failure reviews; 10) not understanding project trade-offs; 11) allowing politics and infighting to affect key decisions; and 12) having ineffectual leadership. Realistically, failure must be seen as a possibility for any project, but this is no cause for discouragement because failures provide valuable experience and grist for wisdom.
Subjects: Project Success|Lessons Learned [Output/Input]
Corporate Names: Project Management Institute.
Physical Description: [] printed p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
CID: 2405    http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100390500&iss=1

Title: Causes of project failure: a survey of professional engineers
Main Author: Black, Ken.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Author: Black, Ken.
Publisher: Project Management Institute
Place: Upper Darby, Pa.
Publication Date: 1996
Type: Journal article
Language: English
Abstract: Project failures are due to many causes. This article presents the results of a survey of 70 professional engineers who were asked to rate 70 prospective reasons for project failure. The most common answer related to inadequate planning, project definition and scope. Other common reasons that were given for project failure included: changed project specifications, incompetent project management, unrealistic scheduling, lack of top management support and involvement, improper funding, inability to contain costs, inadequate resource allocation, poor information management, faulty incentives, failure to assess risks, and supplier defaults. Many of these causes are interrelated and can be mitigated if foreseen ahead of time. The study recommended that project stakeholders be brought into a thorough planning process.|Includes illustrative matter.
Subjects: Project Management (PM)
Project Success
Location: PMI GOC
CID: 3082    http://www.pmi.org/Marketplace/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?GMProduct=00100458200
Additional PMI citations and abstracts on Project Success at 

eReads & Reference

Project Management for the 21st Century, Third Edition by Bennet P. Lientz and Kathryn P. Rea ISBN:012449983x Academic Press © 2002 (396 pages)
Chapter 14: Managing Risks (WHY PROJECTS FAIL)
Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People, Third Edition by J. Davidson Frame  Jossey-Bass © 2003 (258 pages) ISBN:9780787968311
Introduction – Understanding the Process of Managing Projects – Key Lessons to Learn – Lesson 1: Avoiding Pitfalls “…sources of project failure: Organizational factors, Poorly identified customer needs and inadequately specified project requirements,  Poor planning and control…”
Applied Project Management: Best Practices on Implementation by Harold Kerzner, Ph.D.  John Wiley & Sons © 2000 (534 pages) ISBN:0471363529
Chapter 6: The Maturity of Modern Project Management (6.17: Project Failures)
Building Customer-Based Project Organizations by Jeffrey K. Pinto and Pekka J. Rouhiainen ISBN:0471385093 John Wiley & Sons © 2001 (220 pages)
Chapter Three: What Is Project Success and Failure? (Determining Success and Failure)
The AMA Handbook of Project Management, Second Edition by Paul C. Dinsmore and Jeannette Cabanis-Brewin (eds)  AMACOM © 2006 (518 pages) ISBN:0814472710
Chapter 34: Why IT Matters: Project Management for Information Technology (VISIBILITY OF IT PROJECT FAILURES)
Project Management Methodologies: Selecting, Implementing, and Supporting Methodologies and Processes for Projects by Jason Charvat ISBN:0471221783 John Wiley & Sons © 2003 (264 pages)
Chapter 1: Understanding Project Methodologies (Why do Projects Fail?)
Fundamentals of Project Management, Third Edition  by James P. Lewis  AMACOM © 2007 (176 pages) ISBN:0814408796
Chapter 1: An Overview of Project Management (Project Failures)
International Project Management by Bennet P. Lientz and Kathryn P. Rea ISBN:0124499856 Butterworth Heinemann © 2003 (277 pages)
Chapter 1: Introduction (Why International Projects Fail)
Customer-Centered Products: Creating Successful Products Through Smart Requirements Management by Ivy F. Hooks and Kristin A. Farry AMACOM © 2001 (272 pages) ISBN:0814405681
Chapter 1: Requirements- Structure for Success
“Raymond Dion of Raytheon found that approximately 40 percent of the total budget for software projects that he studied was rework. [] Barry Boehm, developer of the most widely used software cost estimation model, estimates that the cost of rework approaches 50 percent on large software projects…”

Harvard Business Review on Managing Projects by Harvard Business School Publishing  Harvard Business School Publishing © 2005 (200 pages) ISBN:1591396395
Why Good Projects Fail Anyway

Web-site links
**Note: Links may have to be “cut” and then “pasted” into URL address box.  You will know to do this if you are either prohited to access links, or asked to logon.

Voices on Project Management: Project Failure Archives    http://blogs.pmi.org/blog/voices_on_project_management/project-failure/ and http://blogs.pmi.org/blog/voices_on_project_management/2008/12/your-problem-isnt.html and    http://blogs.pmi.org/blog/voices_on_project_management/project-failure/2009/06/ and Visualize Your Success – Voices on Project Management   http://blogs.pmi.org/blog/voices_on_project_management/2009/06/visualize-your-success.html


TechRepublic – Different definitions of success may be the root of development project problems By Jerry Loza |  http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10878_11-1054763.html

PMTips – Discussion on Project Success (Defining Project Success)   http://pmtips.net/discussion-project-success/

The Reality of Project Management Practice: Phase two of an ongoing study By Claude Besner PMP and Brian Hobbs PMP  www.pmi.org/PDF/pp_besnerhobbs.pdf

PMI Pittsburgh – Presentation by Paul Russell “The #1 Cause of Projet Failures” http://www.pittsburghpmi.org/documents/meetings/presentations/PaulRussell1CauseofProjectFailures.ppt

Do Project Management Tools and Outcomes Differ in Organizations of Varying Size and Sector?  By Kimberly Furumo, J. Michael Pearson and Nancy L. Martin  in  Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge and Management Volume 1, 2006     http://www.ijikm.org/Volume1/IJIKMv1p023-036Furumo03.pdf

IT-Cortex – Failure Rate http://www.it-cortex.com/Stat_Failure_Rate.htm (statistics) and www.it-cortex.com/Stat_Failure_Cause.htm

InfoQ – Interview: Jim Johnson of the Standish Group http://www.infoq.com/articles/Interview-Johnson-Standish-CHAOS

ITWeb, AST Group – Top 10 Reasons Why Projects Fail http://www.itweb.co.za/office/ast/0107120730.htm

Standish Group Web-site at http://www.standishgroup.com/index.php for Chaos 2007 research results.

Tasmanian Government – Project Management FactSheet http://www.projectmanagement.tas.gov.au/f_sheets/why_project_management_fsv1.0.htm (See “Top 10 Reasons Why Projects Fail”)

CodingHorror – The Long, Dismal History of Software Project Failure http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000588.html

Why projects fail: Computerworld – Choas is Back By Frank Hayes http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/project/story/0,10801,97283,00.html

Cortex – Failure Rates www.it-cortex.com/Stat_Failure_Rate.htm (lists resources for statistics on failure rates)

KPMG – Global IT Project Management Survey – How Committed are You? http://www.kpmg.com.au/aci/docs/irmpmqa-global-it-pm-survey2005.pdf

Optimize Magazine – If IT Projects Fail, Who’s to Blame? By Deborah Bigelow, executive VP, Project Management Solutions March 2005, Issue 41
http://www.optimizemag.com/article/showArticle.jhtml?articleId=60404684 (contains Meta Group survey statistics)

PROJECT SUCCESS AND FAILURE: WHAT IS SUCCESS, WHAT IS FAILURE, AND HOW CAN YOU IMPROVE YOUR ODDS FOR SUCCESS? By Robert Frese http://www.umsl.edu/~sauter/analysis/6840_f03_papers/frese/ (2003)

Info-Tech Research Group McLean Report – Trends in Project Management Part I – Project Failure http://www.infotech.com/MR/Trends%20and%20Predictions/Trends%20in%20Project%20Management%20Part%20I,-c-,%20Project%20Failure.aspx (graphs)

RMIT University -  ARE PROJECT MANAGERS MORE EFFECTIVE AT MANAGING COSTS AND RESOURCES THAN PRODUCT MANAGERS?   A CASE STUDY ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
http://dhtw.tce.rmit.edu.au/MPMwebs/Mcgrath/BIBLIOG.htm (See section under
“Frame, J. Davidson, 1995, Managing Projects in Organisations, Jossey-Bass Inc, USA”)

Standish Group Chaos Report excerpts – http://www.standishgroup.com/sample_research/PDFpages/extreme_chaos.pdf . and Project Success Rates Improved Over 10 Years
Sample research from the Standish Group:  http://www.standishgroup.com/sample_research/index.php and http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&q=cache:rY6wIXew7-0J:www.cin.ufpe.br/~dmc3/disciplina/www/~in953/Chapter30-Johnson.pdf+author:%22Johnson%22+intitle:%22Micro+Projects+Cause+Constant+Change%22+ (contains older, but more detailed statistics)

Athabasca University -  Results of World’s Largest Study on Project Management: Athabasca University Study Indicates High Rate of Project Failure and Accidental Managers in Today’s Organizations http://www.athabascau.ca/media/mba_pm.html (press release contains contact information)

Info-Tech Research Group McLean Report – Trends in Project Management Part I – Project Failure http://www.infotech.com/MR/Trends%20and%20Predictions/Trends%20in%20Project%20Management%20Part%20I,-c-,%20Project%20Failure.aspx (graphs)

Forrester: Project management offices on the rise, but effectiveness dubious; Nearly one-fifth of all new project implementations are over three months late
http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/project/story/0,10801,83159,00.html

ACS Professional Development – A Report on Project Failure and Success Factors http://www.acs.org.au/Certification/Documents/PMgt/2003PM1-ProjectFailure1.pdf

University at Buffalo, State University of New York – Contributors to SW Project Failure http://www-local.cse.buffalo.edu/courseweb/cse442/SWErrors.pdf (presentation)

Johnson, Jim, Karen D. Boucher, Kyle Connors, and James Robinson. 2001. Project management: collaborating on Project success. Software Magazine (Feb./Mar.). Online:

Harvard Business Review – Why Good Projects Fail Anyway http://www.willer.ca/steve/articles/why-good-projects-fail/


From Computerworld – Chaos is Back, By Frank Hayes
http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/project/story/0,10801,97283,00.html

From New Zealand Herald – Hefty Bills for Failed Projects By Anthony Doesburg http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?o_id=330&ObjectID=10009912

From Crosstalk – Software Project Management Practices: Failure Versus Success© Capers Jones, Software Productivity Research LLC
http://www.stsc.hill.af.mil/crosstalk/2004/10/0410Jones.html

Gantthead – Discussion on Project Management Failure Statistics – http://www.gantthead.com/discussions/discussionsTopicContainer.cfm?ID=4341

Johnson, Jim, Karen D. Boucher, Kyle Connors, and James Robinson. 2001. Project Management: Collaborating on Project Success. Software Magazine (Feb./Mar.). Online:

IEEE Digital Library -IT Failure Rates–70% or 10-15%? By Robert L. Glass, Computing Trends  http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MS.2005.66 (available for purchase via IEEE)

From CIO Information Network Why projects fail; Software Project Failure: The Reasons, the Costs, By Carmin Mangione http://www.cioupdate.com/reports/article.php/1563701

ComputerWorld – Survey Shows Common IT Woes Persist, By Julia King
http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/story/0,10801,82404,00.html
ComputerWorld – Forrester: Project management offices on the rise, but effectiveness dubious, By Thomas Hoffman
http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/project/story/0,10801,83159,00.html and Bouncing Back, By Melissa Soloman
http://www.computerworld.com/news/2000/story/0,11280,49837,00.html


InfoWorld – The 70-percent Failure, By Bob Lewis (free registration at site required to read content)
http://archive.infoworld.com/articles/op/xml/01/10/29/011029opsurvival.xml

Project Management Tools and Software Failures and Successes, By Capers Joneshttp://www.stsc.hill.af.mil/crosstalk/1998/07/tools.pdf
Software Project Management Meets Six Sigma. Part 2: Top-down Project Effort, Duration, and Defect Prediction, By David L. Hallowell

STSC Crosstalk – Lessons Learned From Another Failed Software Contract By Dr. Randall W. Jensen http://www.stsc.hill.af.mil/crosstalk/2003/09/0309Jensen.html

Interthink – 2004 Organizational Project Management Baseline Study – http://www.interthink.ca/research/home.html

Standish Group — authors of the ongoing CHAOS Chronicles, www.standishgroup.com. If you search at their site from the home page search box on “Project Management” you can get some selected excerpts of CHAOS findings.


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Alguns artigos são escritos pela equipe do Dr. Alberto Birman

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